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Curt Brasket

Published on: 2015-04-02

March 31, 2014

A tribute to Curt Brasket on chess.com by Sean Nagle

http://www.chess.com/article/view/remembering-curt-brasket

Curtis J. Brasket became interested in chess at age 13 after finding a book on the game at the local library – though he had at the time been looking for a book on checkers.

In 1952 at age 20, Curt won the US Junior Chess Championship held in Omaha.[2] During the 1970s he competed in a number of Lone Pine International tournaments, occasionally defeating grandmasters such as Walter Browne, Arnold Denker and Larry Evans. His peak FIDE rating was 2375 in January 1978, and in 1983 he was awarded the International Chess Federation (FIDE) Master title. He also held the title of Life Master with the US Chess Federation.

Curt was Minnesota State Champion for a record 16 times, and North Central Champion 3 times.

Despite being diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 1973, between 1991 and his final tournament in 2011, Brasket competed in 583 tournaments. In 2013 he received the US Chess Federation Outstanding Career Achievement Award.

For Curt, of chess was so much more than pieces on a board.

“He saw chess as making the right moves in life at the right time,” said Rita Brasket, his wife of 50 years. “And it didn’t matter whether you were rich or poor or how much money you made, or where you lived. If you played a good chess game, it told that you were a deep thinker.”

In a tournament in 2000 Curt played against Sean Nagle, who, like other young players, learned from playing against Brasket.  Nagle is the current Minnesota champion.

“While his advanced Parkinson’s disease prevented him from being a serious contender for the title, he was still a dangerous competitor, and I was lucky to escape with a draw in our head-to-head match up,” Nagle said.

 “Curt was a truly a towering figure in Minnesota chess.  It is difficult to overstate the magnitude of his achievements or of his dominance of the Minnesota chess scene during his prime years. Curt’s love of the game led him to remain an active tournament player despite his battle with Parkinson’s disease.”

 

A tribute to Curt Brasket on chess.com by Sean Nagle

http://www.chess.com/article/view/remembering-curt-brasket
 
 
 

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